Review: This is Just My Face: Try Not to Stare by Gabourey Sidibe

THIS BOOK IS SO GOOD!

This is Just my Face is Gabourey Sidibe’s memoir and it was delightful. She is funny, snarky, thoughtful and insightful. She talks about her family and her childhood. She also talks about getting the role of Precious. I plowed through this memoir; it was like sitting down and having coffee with a friend. I’m not really a celebrity memoir person, but a friend recommended it to me and I’m so happy that I did.

So, 10/10, would totally recommend.

Advertisements

Happy International Women’s Day!

all wonderwoman

Happy International Women’s Day!  We at Stacks have been lucky to have so many strong women in our lives to support us and make us better.  We also have read some amazing women authors as well.  Thank you to all the women who have come before us and here’s to all the women that will come after us!  Let’s continue to support and inspire each other and there is nothing we can’t accomplish!

March: Discussion Part 4

9781603093958_p0_v6_s192x300Today is the last day of February and as such the last day of our group read of John Lewis’ March. Were you able to finish all three volumes of March?  What are your final observations?  What will you take away from John Lewis’ story?  I was really moved by his story but it also illustrated my own privilege.  There are many small things that I have taken for granted. Obviously, I was raised in a different time and place but I’ve never had to worry about where I had to sit on a bus or be concerned about what truck stops to stops at when traveling with my family.  My life would never be threatened because I wanted to register vote.  Even now,. as more and more states tighten of voting laws, I don’t feel that my constitutional rights will be threatened but I do worry for minorities and marginalized groups having their rights stripped away.  We have not come as far as we think we have.  Old prejudice are hard die and I worry about how much farther we will fall back.  It’s also makes me think about what I’m willing to go to jail for or willing to be beaten for.  I’m not really sure.  This year, I’ve already participated in my first protest march and have called my Congress representatives more then I have ever in the past.  I’m not sure I have the bravery of John Lewis and Fannie Lou Hamer, Rosa Parks and so many others.  I seriously hope that it won’t come to that.  That we will be able to keep our protest peaceful and those we opposed will to as well.  The importance of this book is so we don’t forget the mistakes of our past.  To remind all of us about our history so we are not doomed to repeat it.  Knowledge is truly power.

 

 

March: Discussion Part 3

9781603093958_p0_v6_s192x300I would like to discuss the format. What do you think about John Lewis presenting this story as a graphic novel instead of a straight narrative story?  I personally, I loved it.  I think it was kind of genius. It’s one thing to read about the sit-ins, marches and the violence that followed but it’s another thing to have it visualized.  The illustrations are truly powerful and really make his story and the story of the Civil Rights movement come to life.  The graphic novel format also makes it more accessible.  How many kids or teens willing read history books?  All three books were quick reads but still powerful.  Giving the readers a full look of all the challenges that John Lewis and the movement faced.  The sacrifices that they made, knowing that they could be arrested or killed.  The visual aspect of the novel makes all of these more powerful because the illustrations are simple, yet specific.

Do you agree with me? What do you think of the presentation?

March: Discussion Part 2

9781603093958_p0_v6_s192x300 Hello, Beth here.  

I have had many reactions to this trilogy so far. I’ll admit it’s not an easy read as there are a lot of hard truths here. The question I keep asking myself is how can I be shocked when I know what’s going to happen? I know my history. I know this was not one of America’s proudest moments in our history. I studied in school about the protests and violent reaction to them. I’ve read about Emmit Till, Medger Evers and Freedom Rides.  So why am I’m still shocked to read how violent they were? How am I still shocked to read how angry, hurtful and full of hate people can be? It’s not like they were asking for huge things. They wanted to eat at the counters of stores they just bought merchandise in. They wanted to go to the movies. They wanted to ride the bus. They wanted to vote. How are any of these extraordinary requests? How am I still shocked by these when the news lately are full of people saying angry, hurtful and full of hate? Why do I feel like we are repeating history?

What is everyone else’s reactions so far?

Beth and Kate read: March by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell (Artist)

9781603093958_p0_v6_s192x300

This February Beth and I are going to be doing something we’ve talked about but haven’t yet done. We’re going to be reading a book together (or, three books as the case may be). Starting February 1st, we will be reading March by John Lewis. This award winning book tells the story of Congressman John Lewis’s coming of age in the Civil Rights movement. We invite you to join us in this reading. As we read, we will be posting our thoughts and open-ended questions. We hope that you will join us for the reading and some discussion.

 

 

Diverse Stacks, Diverse Lives 2016

bookchallenge2016image

Kate and I have given updates on our Challenges and well we are not doing as well as both of would like.  We want to know, dear readers, how many of you attempted our Diverse Stack, Diverse Lives Reading Challenge?  With only 31 days left how many books have you read and how many more do you need to complete yours?  We are thinking of doing this again next year but changing the focus to only on sub-challenge instead of three.  We are open to suggestions.  What should we add to next years challenge?  What should we leave off?  Let us know how we can make next year’s challenge more accessible while still helping us all reach our goals of diversifying our reading lists.